Mindfulness

Mindfulness is part of Buddhist practice and means ‘Awareness.’ It is a simple idea that can have immediate results. Many forms of therapy today recommend Mindfulness as something that we can all practice daily whether on a walk, in the office, at home, on the train and so on. So it is portable, doesn’t need any equipment and is free to use for yourself. It is very relevant for life today where we feel that we don’t have time to look around.

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to ourselves and to become aware of our internal state; thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations as well as the environment. This happens in the present moment and we allow ourselves to have these experiences in non-judgemental ways. As a result we can make more informed decisions because of our increased awareness, clarity and acceptance of our present-moment reality.

You can practice Mindfulness irrespective of beliefs that you currently hold. It is a simple way to notice your thoughts, bodily sensations, and our your five senses, just to notice. The skills are simple but require practice.

Mindfulness might simply be described as choosing and learning to control our focus of attention and to make conscious choices in life.

 Mindfulness is something that I offer because it can offer significant and immediate benefits.

If it is appropriate we can explore mindfulness as a part of therapy and I can guide you in it’s use. I have added some useful links below for you to explore

 


A video on a mindful practice from the Presencing Institute

 

These are links to smartphone app store mindfulness resources

Windows 10 Zen Mindfulness

Similar apps are available for Apple and Android


 

Here are some links to mindful meditation audio downloads.

http://marc.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=22&oTopID=22


This is a link to the free Mindfulness book, Mindfulness in Plain English.

http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma4/mpe.html


Keep a feeling diary or journal of feelings and emotions.

here’s a bit of motivation from the Guardian

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/feb/15/psychology-usa


this is a link to Wikihow and is a a good general guide if you haven’t kept a journal before. take what you want from it and ditch the rest.

http://www.wikihow.com/Keep-a-Journal


Relaxation techniques for stress relief at:

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_relief_meditation_yoga_relaxation.htm


 

Local resources that can help with a variety of relaxation ways, such as:

http://www.stressedlemons.co.uk/